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Karl Stefanovic forced to intervene during fiery live TV clash with Bill Shorten on Today


Bill Shorten fires back after being slammed over Labor’s ‘radical climate agenda’ by Matt Canavan – before Karl Stefanovic is forced to intervene

  • Bill Shorten erupted into war of words with Nationals senator Matt Canavan
  • Pair had been discussing result of the election before conversation spiralled
  • Mr Canavan defended decision for party to not get tough on climate change

A fired-up Bill Shorten told Matt Canavan he was ‘barking at the moon’ during a heated debate on live television forcing host Karl Stefanovic to step in.

The former Labor leader erupted into a war of words with the Nationals senator as they discussed the result of the election on the Today Show on Monday.

Stefanovic questioned whether the National Party of Australia had lost votes and struggled to win the election with the Liberals for not getting tough on climate policies.

Mr Canavan, who previously said the net zero target by 2050 was ‘dead’, slammed the ‘radical environmentalist agenda’ claiming Australians did not want a party that stood for ‘higher regulation or higher government control’.

A fired-up Bill Shorten told Matt Canavan he was ‘barking at the moon’ during a heated debate on live television forcing host Karl Stefanovic to step in

The former Labor leader erupted into a war of words with the Nationals senator (pictured, Matt Canavan) as they discussed the result of the election on the Today Show on Monday

The former Labor leader erupted into a war of words with the Nationals senator (pictured, Matt Canavan) as they discussed the result of the election on the Today Show on Monday

Mr Shorten said Mr Canavan was acting like the ‘election never happened’ after Labor won the night and the ‘teal’ independents gained crucial ground with both parties addressing climate change in their election campaigns.

‘He reminds me of that Japanese soldier they found in the Phillipines in the 1970s,’ Mr Shorten said. ‘He still thought the war was on.’

A worked-up Mr Canavan quickly cut off Mr Shorten to defend his stance.

‘I’m going to keep fighting, Bill,’ he said. ‘That is me to a ‘T”.

Mr Shorten responded: ‘I’m sure there is a tent in the Phillipines with a World War Two circa rifle for you.’

The discussion quickly spiralled into chaos with Mr Shorten unable to get in a full sentence as Mr Canavan spoke over him.

‘Well let’s just see what energy prices do, Bill,’ he said. ‘Let’s just see what electricity prices do. How long your commitment to climate action lasts.’

Stefanovic was forced to intervene calling for calm between the warring pair.

‘Guys, guys,’ Stefanovic said. ‘Okay, you two. This is like Saturday night fever all over again on a Monday morning.’ 

Stefanovic questioned whether the National Party of Australia had lost votes and struggled to win the election with the Liberals for not getting tough on climate policies

Stefanovic questioned whether the National Party of Australia had lost votes and struggled to win the election with the Liberals for not getting tough on climate policies

It’s unclear whether prime minister Anthony Albanese’s party could form a majority government or will have to rely on an increased number of independents and minor party lawmakers who won seats in Saturday’s election. 

A total of 15 seats had been declared for independents or minor party candidates. 

Of these, three were from the environment-centric Green party and 12 were non-aligned politicians, with up to nine of those so-called teal independents. 

Labor may need the support of some of those winners, depending on who secures the seven seats still undecided. 

In a new wave in Australian politics, the teal independents are marketed as a greener shade than the Liberal Party’s traditional blue color and want stronger government action on reducing Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions than either the government or Labor are proposing. 

Prime minister Mr Albanese vowed to bring Australians together, increase investment in social services and ‘end the climate wars.’

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