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How Anthony Albanese became prime minister despite lower primary vote for Labor than 2019 election


Anthony Albanese has taken Labor to a federal election victory with a lower primary vote than the party recorded at its 2019 loss.

With 66 per cent of the primary vote counted across Australia on Sunday morning, Labor is on 32 per cent of the primary vote to 35 per cent for the Coalition.

The Greens have picked picked up 12.9 per cent of the primary vote and Independents have scored 5.5 per cent.

Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party has garnered 4.2 per cent as of Sunday morning while Pauline Hanson‘s One Nation is at 4.9 per cent and the Liberal Democrats at 1.7 per cent.

In 2019, Labor and then leader by Bill Shorten, were defeated with 33.34 per cent of the primary vote.

Bill Shorten concedes defeat on stage next to his wife Chloe (pictured) during the federal Labor Reception on Election Day in Melbourne in May 2019

Anthony Albanese (centre) vanquished Scott Morrison to become only the fourth Labor leader to win government from opposition since World War II

Anthony Albanese (centre) vanquished Scott Morrison to become only the fourth Labor leader to win government from opposition since World War II 

The major changes in this year’s election results are a swing to Greens which have seen a surge in popularity up from 10.4 per cent in 2019 with preferences going to Labor.

Independents too have seen a wave of support up from 3.37 per cent in 2019.

This is largely courtesy of the 22 ‘teal independent’ candidates who set out to snatch voters from conservative Liberal strongholds by offering a focus on climate policy.

This proved successful with Independent Allegra Spender claiming victory in the blue ribbon Liberal seat of Wentworth – ex-PM Malcolm Turnbull’s former seat. 

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg looks set to also lose his seat of Kooyong to teal candidate Monique Ryan, though stopped short of conceding on Sunday morning opting to wait for postal votes. 

There have been concerns the Liberal’s moderate faction would be decimated with the rise of the teal independents. 

One of the most senior moderates left in the LNP Simon Birminghan said on Sunday morning he hoped the party could bring in more women to party following Scott Morrison’s resignation on Saturday night.

‘I will be looking to whoever takes on that role (of party leader) to ensure we bring into Liberal fold more women so we can ensure our party reflects modern Australia in its ranks,’ he said.

Allegra Spender (right), Independent candidate for Wentworth hugs her sister Bianca Spender outside Bondi Beach Public School on Saturday (pictured)

Allegra Spender (right), Independent candidate for Wentworth hugs her sister Bianca Spender outside Bondi Beach Public School on Saturday (pictured)

Non-teal Indpendent Dai Le looks also to knock out Labor’s Home Affairs minister Kristina Keneally in the seat of Fowler where she was parachuted in.

The former NSW premier, moved from Scotland Island in Sydney’s northern beaches to Fowler ahead of the election and said she would stay there if she lost.

While she has not conceded defeat in the seat, Senator Keneally commended her opponent’s campaign on Saturday night.

 ‘I know that we are here tonight to have a celebration and yet as we are here gathered this evening it’s not entirely clear yet, the result in Fowler, and I do want to congratulate Dai Le and Courtney Nguyen on the campaigns that they ran,’ she said.

A swing of 1.89 per cent has also gone to One Nation in 2022. 

But in the Senate, voters have turned their backs on founder Pauline Hanson, who could lose her spot.

The conservative politician’s party is trailing behind the Queensland Greens candidate Penny Allman-Payne in the race.

Senator Hanson, who had to spend election day in isolation after testing positive to Covid-19, was well short of a quota on Saturday night as counting continued.

Her party polled 7.8 per cent of the Senate vote, to the Greens’ 14 per cent.

Anthony Albanese during the 2019 election campaign (pictured)

Anthony Albanese during the 2019 election campaign (pictured)

In the Lower House, the Greens have picked up three Queensland seats to join leader Adam Bandt in Melbourne where he scored 52 per cent of the primary vote, ahead of Labor with 25 per cent.  

The Greens will pick up Griffith from Labor’s Teri Butler and Ryan from the Liberal’s Julian Simmonds in a so-called ‘greenslide’ and are ahead in Brisbane. 

While his Mr Albanese’s prime ministership is almost certain, less clear is whether Labor will be able to govern in its own right, or whether it will need the help of an expanded crossbench.

The crossbench is looking to double its size with Labor possibly having to work with either the Greens or Indpendents. 

Speaking to almost 1000 party faithful at Labor’s election night event in Sydney’s inner west, Mr Albanese said he was humbled by the victory.

‘No matter how you voted … the government I lead will respect every one of you every day,’ he told the crowd.

‘We can have an even better future if we seize the opportunities that are right there in front of us.’

Ellen Sandell, Deputy Leader of the Victorian Greens and Adam Bandt, Greens leader and Federal Member for Melbourne on Saturday in Melbourne (pictured)

Ellen Sandell, Deputy Leader of the Victorian Greens and Adam Bandt, Greens leader and Federal Member for Melbourne on Saturday in Melbourne (pictured)

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, the head of Aotearoa’s Labour Party, said she was looking forward to working with her new Australian counterpart.

‘Australia is our most important partner, our only official ally and single economic market relationship, and I believe our countries will work even more closely together,’ she said. 

SEATS CHANGING HANDS IN 2022

NSW

Fowler – Kristina Keneally (LAB) to Dai Le (IND)

Hughes – Craig Kelly (IND) to Jenny Ware (LIB)

Gilmore – Fiona Phillips (ALP) is trailing Andrew Constance (LIB)

Reid – Fiona Martin (LIB) to Sally Sitou (ALP)

Robertson – Lucy Wicks (LIB) to Gordon Reid (ALP)

Wentworth – Dave Sharma (LIB) to Allegra Spender (IND)

Mackellar – Jason Falinski (LIB) to Sophie Scamps (IND)

North Sydney – Trent Zimmerman (LIB) to Kylea Tink (IND)

Hunter – Joel Fitzgibbon (ALP retired) to Dan Repacholi (ALP)

VIC

Chisholm – Gladys Liu (LIB) to Carina Garland (ALP)

Goldstein – Tim Wilson (LIB) to Zoe Daniel (IND)

Nicholls – Damian Drum (NAT retired) to Sam Birrell (NAT)

Kooyong – Josh Frydenberg (LIB) to Monique Ryan (IND)

Higgins – Katie Allen (LIB) to Michelle Ananda-Rajah (ALP)

WA

Pearce – Christian Porter (LIB retired) to Tracey Roberts (ALP)

Hasluck – Ken Wyatt (LIB) to Tania Lawrence (ALP)

Swan – Steve Irons (LIB retired) to Zaneta Mascarenhas (ALP)

Tangney – Ben Morton (LIB) to Sam Lim (ALP)

QLD

Griffith – Terri Butler (ALP) is trailing Max Chandler-Mather (GRE)

Ryan – Julian Simmonds (LIB) to Elizabeth Watson-Brown (GRE)

SA

Boothby – Nicolle Flint (LIB retired) to Louise Miller-Frost (ALP)

PLUS

* New Victorian seat of Hawke to Sam Rae (ALP)

* WA seat of Stirling abolished. Vince Connolly (LIB) lost in Cowan to Anne Aly (ALP).



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